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Gaining insights into winning football strategies using machine learning

University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign (UIUC) has partnered with the Amazon Machine Learning Solutions Lab to help UIUC football coaches prepare for games more efficiently and improve their odds of winning. Previously, coaches prepared for games by creating a game planning sheet that only featured types of plays for a certain down and distance, and […]

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University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign (UIUC) has partnered with the Amazon Machine Learning Solutions Lab to help UIUC football coaches prepare for games more efficiently and improve their odds of winning.

Previously, coaches prepared for games by creating a game planning sheet that only featured types of plays for a certain down and distance, and where the team was on the field. As a result, the coaching staff might miss important scenarios and opportunities. Additionally, preparing a game planning sheet was a manual process, with new data for each game being entered into a template each week, which is time-consuming and not scalable.

To add more insights to the current call sheet templates and help coaches prepare for games better, the team combined UIUC’s deep expertise in college football and coaching with the machine learning (ML) capabilities of Amazon SageMaker to create a state-of-the-art ML model that predicts the result of UIUC’s football plays. In addition, UIUC coaches now have an auto-generated visual game planning sheet based on key features that the model recommends. This gives them more insights on their strategy for the game and reduces the time it takes to generate the visual game planning sheets from 2.5 hours to less than 30 seconds.

“The UIUC Athletic department collaborated with the Amazon ML Solutions Lab to harness the power of machine learning to derive data-driven insights on what features to include in our planning and preparation for our football games,” says Kingsley Osei-Asibey, Director of Analytics & Football Technology at UIUC. “By selecting AWS as our primary ML/AI platform, we got to work alongside the experts at the ML Solutions Lab to create new and interesting insights using Amazon SageMaker. Now, all the manual analysis of data from past games that took us hours is automated, and our Fighting Illini coaches can generate weekly visual game planning sheets against different opponents at the press of a button.”

This post looks at how the Amazon ML Solutions Lab used features related to the plays during a football game to predict the result of a play, and then used the XGBoost importance score feature and correlation analysis to recommend features for coaches to analyze.

We provide code snippets to show you how we used the Amazon SageMaker XGBoost library to generate feature importance scores.

Data and model

We used UIUC’s game data from the 2018–2019 college football season, covering 24 features including in-game statistics, location of the play, UIUC’s strategies, and their opponent’s play types. We used those features to train an XGBoost model to predict if an offensive play will result in a win or loss. The UIUC coaches decided whether it’s a win or loss for a play based on different situations.

We then used the feature importance scores to select key features. We used the model for feature-selection purposes to recommend important scenarios represented by features. We selected XGBoost because it performs well on features with complex distributions, and it outputs feature importance scores to help us with feature selection and model interpretation.

The main goal was to generate game planning sheets for football coaches to use in games to give them an edge. We used the features from a well performant ML model trained to classify successful and unsuccessful plays to inform coaches and generate game planning sheets.

The following diagram summarizes the modeling steps taken to generate the ML-based features for the game planning sheet.

The rows are shuffled and split into five non-overlapping folds, which are then further split into training and validation sets. The training sets of each fold are balanced using the Synthetic Minority Oversampling Technique (SMOTE) algorithm.

Each fold includes the following steps:

  1. Calculate a new feature score:
    1. Train an XGBoost model on the balanced training data set and extract the feature importances feat_i.
    2. Compute the Pearson’s correlation of the features and label in the balanced training dataset corr_i.
    3. Compute a new feature score as the product of absolute correlation and feature importance feature_score_i = feat_i * abs(corr_i).
  2. Sort the features based on the feat_score.
  3. Train multiple XGBoost models using the top 5 features, top 10 features, and so on, and evaluate validation balanced accuracy for each model.
  4. Choose the best-performing model.

After we trained models from each of the five folds, we merged the important features. A feature is selected for the game planning sheet if it appears in the top 10 features (ranked by feature importance score) of at least three folds.

Calculating the new feature score

In the previous section, we described the construction of a new feature score. This new feature score incorporates the feature importance from a non-linear XGBoost model, as well as direct linear correlation. The purpose of this new feature score is to select features that are relevant to winning or losing a play. A feature with a high feature score has high XGBoost feature importance and high linear correlation with the label, making it a relevant feature for game planning sheets.

In this section, we dive deeper into the construction of the new feature score with code snippets. The feature score is a combination of feature importance from a trained XGBoost model and linear correlation of the features and the label.

First, we train an XGBoost model using Amazon SageMaker built-in algorithms. Amazon SageMaker is a fully managed service that provides every developer and data scientist with the ability to build, train, and deploy ML models quickly. Amazon SageMaker provides several built-in algorithms (such as XGBoost) for a variety of problem types.

This trained XGBoost model provides a first look into which features are important to the UIUC football team winning a play. See the following code:

from sagemaker.amazon.amazon_estimator import get_image_uri
container = get_image_uri(region, "xgboost", "0.90-1") hyperparameters = { "max_depth":"7", "eta":"0.01", "gamma":"3", "min_child_weight":"6", "subsample":"0.6", "silent":"0", "objective":"binary:logistic", "num_round":"330"
} instance_type = 'ml.m5.2xlarge'
output_path = "s3://{}/{}/{}/output".format(bucket, "model", "xgboost") job_name = "xgboost-".format(i+1) + time.strftime("%Y-%m-%d-%H-%M-%S", time.gmtime()) estimator = sagemaker.estimator.Estimator( container, role, hyperparameters=hyperparameters, train_instance_count=1, train_instance_type=instance_type, train_volume_size=5, output_path=output_path, sagemaker_session=sagemaker.Session()
) train_input = sagemaker.s3_input( s3_data="s3://{}/{}/{}".format(bucket, "train", "balanced_train_data.csv"), content_type='csv'
)
estimator.fit({"train": train_input}, job_name=job_name)

Amazon SageMaker stores the model object in the specified Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) bucket. To calculate the feature score, we need to download model.tar.gz from Amazon S3 to our Amazon SageMaker notebook instance. See the following code:

model_path = "s3://{}/{}/{}/output/{}".format( bucket, "model", "xgboost", "xgboost-2019-06-16-09-56-39-854/output/model.tar.gz"
) fs = s3fs.S3FileSystem() with fs.open(model_path, "rb") as f: with tarfile.open(fileobj=f, mode="r") as tar_f: with tar_f.extractfile("xgboost-model") as extracted_f: xgbooster = pickle.load(extracted_f)

Finally, we calculate the new feature score as feature_score_i = feat_i * abs(corr_i). We use the absolute value of the correlation because our goal is to find features that are relevant to winning or losing a play, and a highly negative correlation indicates a strong linear relationship between the feature and the UIUC football team losing the play. See the following code:

#the xgbooster object replaces the original feature names with 'f0,...f'
#here we create a mapping to obtain the original feature names
feature_name_map = dict(zip([f"f{i}" for i in range(len(feature_names))], feature_names)) features_importance_df = pd.DataFrame([xgbooster.get_fscore()], index=["weight"]).T
features_importance_df["normalized_weight"] = features_importance_df["weight"]/features_importance_df["weight"].sum()
feature_importances_df["feature_name"] = feature_importances_df.index.map(feature_name_map) correlation_df = pd.DataFrame(balanced_train_data_df[FEATURES].corr()[LABEL])
correlation_df["absolute_corr"] = correlation_df[LABEL].abs() feature_score_df = pd.merge( features_importance_df, correlation_df.reset_index(), left_on="feature_name", right_on="index"
) feature_score_df["feature_score"] = feature_score_df["absolute_corr"] * feature_score_df["normalized_weight"]

The following graph shows a plot of feature_score vs.rank for each fold. High values on the y-axis indicate that the feature was important for the XGBoost model and has high correlation with winning or losing a play. The key takeaway from this plot is additional features after feature number 105 don’t add any new information, and the optimum number of features to use lies between 0–105.

Evaluating the model

We performed five-fold cross-validation on the XGBoost model, and compared it to three baseline models: a model predicting every sample as lost, a model predicting every sample as win, and a random model assigning win or loss with a 50/50 chance.

Because the dataset is imbalanced with 56% of the plays labeled as lost and 44% as won, we used the weighted accuracy metrics considering the class weights when comparing our model to the naïve baselines. The weighted accuracy for all three naïve baselines is 50%, and average weighted accuracy of the XGBoost is 65.2% across five folds, which shows that our model has 15% improvement compared to the baselines.

The following plot shows validation balanced accuracy vs. the number of top features for each fold. For each data point, an XGBoost model is trained using the top n features, where n is the value on the x-axis, and evaluated on the fold’s validation dataset to obtain the validation balanced accuracy. The top performing model for each is annotated in the plot. For example, Fold 0’s best-performing model uses the top 60 features (as determined in the preceding plot), which has a validation balanced accuracy of 64.8%. Features ranked above 105 aren’t evaluated because the previous plot shows that features ranked above 105 contribute little information.

The following table summarizes the results of the procedure we outlined. For each fold, the balanced accuracy performance improves after performing feature selection, with an average increase of 3.2%.

Fold Validation BA with all Features Validation BA with Best Features Number of Features
0 60.30% 64.80% 60
1 64.50% 64.50% 105
2 63.70% 68.50% 30
3 61.40% 64.70% 25
4 60% 63.70% 10
AVG 62% 65.20%

To further improve the models, we used Amazon SageMaker automated model tuning for hyperparameter optimization. We used the best features identified in the preceding step for each fold, and performed 20 iterations of Bayesian optimization on each fold.

Feature selection and game planning sheet recommendation across five folds

The end goal is to create a new game planning sheet using features derived from the XGBoost models. A high-performing model indicates that the extracted features are relevant to winning a play. The output of the training stage results in an XGBoost model for each fold. A feature is selected for the game planning sheet if it appears in the top 10 features (ranked by feature importance score) of at least three folds.

After reviewing these features with the UIUC coaching staff, the coaches designed new game planning sheets to analyze the best play types based on how their opponent would be playing defense. These additional features will help the coaches prepare more scenarios before the games start, and players can react faster and more accurately against opponents.

Summary

UIUC football coaches partnered with the Amazon ML Solutions Lab and created an ML model to gain more insights on their performance and strategies. This solution also saves the coaches’ time when preparing for a game; instead of manually analyzing the best plays to call under different situations, coaches can automate this process using the features the ML model recommends.

This model is customized for UIUC’s football team and their opponents, and will help UIUC’s coaches prepare for more scenarios in upcoming seasons. Additionally, it will help players react correctly and quickly to game situations.

If you’d like help accelerating the use of ML in your products and services, please contact the Amazon ML Solutions Lab program.


About the Authors

 Ninad Kulkarni is a Data Scientist in the Amazon Machine Learning Solutions Lab. He helps customers adopt ML and AI by building solutions to address their business problems. Most recently, he has built predictive models for sports and automotive customers.

Daliana Zhen Liu is a Data Scientist in the Amazon Machine Learning Solutions Lab. She has built ML models to help customers accelerate their business in sports, media and education. She is passionate about introducing data science to more people.

Tianyu Zhang is a Data Scientist in the Amazon Machine Learning Solutions Lab. He helps customers solve business problems by applying ML and AI techniques. Most recently, he has built NLP model and predictive model for procurement and sports.

Source: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/machine-learning/gaining-insights-into-winning-football-strategies-using-machine-learning/

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5 Work From Home Office Essentials

Working remotely from home had been increasing in popularity, but it’s now become a necessity for many professionals due to the pandemic. “Some companies are eager to reopen their doors and return to the office, but a large number of employer and employees are making the transitional work environment a permanent change.”  They can’t guarantee […]

The post 5 Work From Home Office Essentials appeared first on Aiiot Talk – Artificial Intelligence | Internet of Things | Technology.

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Working remotely from home had been increasing in popularity, but it’s now become a necessity for many professionals due to the pandemic.

“Some companies are eager to reopen their doors and return to the office, but a large number of employer and employees are making the transitional work environment a permanent change.” 

They can’t guarantee their health and safety in a socially-crowded space, plus, companies are able to save tons of money they would have spent on their commercial lease or mortgage payments.

That’s not the say that working from home doesn’t come at its own costs, however. It can lead to a huge hit in productivity without the right equipment in place. To maximize your performance and efficiency in a remote setting, be sure to purchase these five office essentials.

1. Powerful PC

This one probably feels like an obvious pointer, but let’s knock it off our list. You won’t be able to get by with a make-shift work station and in today’s digital domain, your computer will be at the core of everything you do.

Never-ending loading wheels, delayed downloads, and slow rendering will add seconds to every task you do, so if your company didn’t provide you with a workhorse computer tower, you might look into investing in one yourself, then deduct the cost in your tax return.

Depending on your line of work, it might make more sense to go for a laptop vs a desktop computer. Unless your tasks demand super sophisticated software and large storage space, you can probably get by with a portable PC. That way, when coffee shops begin to reopen and allow patrons to sit inside, you can work on-the-go without feeling tethered to your desk.

2. Ergonomic Office Chair

If you’re looking at a long-term remote situation, it’s worth spending the big bucks on an ergonomic office chair. You should feel comfortably locked into your seat for eight hours a day—at least if you want to concentrate on your workflow, rather than the cramp in your back.

Shop around for an office chair that’s sophisticated in design and specifically built to hold the human body. Some stand-out features you should look out for include:

  • Targeted support around the lumbar spine
  • Adjustable height so you can adjust the seat as necessary for your arms to rest naturally on the keyboard
  • Swivel base to effortlessly turn your body, preventing neck strain
  • Cushioned seat to comfort your tailbone
  • Ventilated fabric that promotes airflow so you don’t feel overheated when sitting in the chair for several hours

You might have to pay a couple of hundred dollars for the best-of-the-line features, but there is another item that might qualify as an eligible tax deduction—just be sure to keep all your receipts organized with a document scanner in case the IRS raises their eyebrows and issues an audit.

3. Wireless Keyboard

If you want to type faster and feel better while you’re at it, then a wireless keyboard is clutch. They enable you to bring the keys closer, decreasing the extension length of your arms and accompanying shoulder strain.

“It also helps reduce the strain on your eyes by moving the bright screen farther away from your direct line of sight.” 

And, last but not least, the keys are placed in an ergonomic position for a more natural finger splay, with ample cushioning wrist cushioning that helps prevent overuse injuries such as a carpal tunnel.

4. Noise-cancelling Headphones

To truly get in the zone, you should block out distractions with headphones the cancel noise in your environment—especially if your work station is set up in a common area. Other tips to stay focused include installing a website blocker and leaving your cellphone on the other side of the room.

5. House plant or flowers

People are scientifically proven to be more productive when working near fresh flowers or lush greenery. The good news is that you don’t need to have a green thumb or natural lighting to achieve this effect—even artificial foliage can brighten your mood and improve your performance.

Working from home sometimes can feel like you’re locked inside all day, so bringing the outside world inside your space can help ward off burnout.

Take these tips with you into 2021 and set yourself up for success in your new home office setting.

Source: https://www.aiiottalk.com/business/work-from-home-office-essentials/

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zomato digitizes menus using Amazon Textract and Amazon SageMaker

This post is co-written by Chiranjeev Ghai, ML Engineer at zomato. zomato is a global food-tech company based in India. Are you the kind of person who has very specific cravings? Maybe when the mood hits, you don’t want just any kind of Indian food—you want Chicken Chettinad with a side of paratha, and nothing […]

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This post is co-written by Chiranjeev Ghai, ML Engineer at zomato. zomato is a global food-tech company based in India.

Are you the kind of person who has very specific cravings? Maybe when the mood hits, you don’t want just any kind of Indian food—you want Chicken Chettinad with a side of paratha, and nothing else will hit the spot! To help picky eaters satisfy their cravings, we at zomato have recently added enhanced search engine capabilities to our restaurant aggregation and food delivery platform. These capabilities enable us to recommend restaurants to zomato users based on searches for specific dishes.

We power this functionality with machine learning (ML), using it to extract and structure text data from menu images. To develop this menu digitization technology, we partnered with Amazon ML Solutions Lab to explore the capabilities of the AWS ML Stack. This post summarizes how we used Amazon Textract and Amazon SageMaker to develop a customized menu digitization solution.

Extracting raw text from menus with Amazon Textract

The first component of this solution was to accurately extract all the text in the menu image. This process is known as optical character recognition (OCR). For our use case, we experimented with both in-house and commercial OCR solutions.

We first created an in-house OCR solution by stacking a pre-trained text detection model and a pre-trained text recognition model. The challenge with these models was that they were trained on a standard text dataset that didn’t match the eclectic fonts found in restaurant menus. To improve system performance, we fine-tuned these models by generating a dataset of 1.5 million synthetic text images that were more representative of text in menus.

After evaluating our in-house solution and several commercial OCR solutions, we found that Amazon Textract offers the best text recognition precision and recall. Restaurants often get creative when designing their menus, so OCR robustness was crucial for this use case. Amazon Textract particularly differentiated itself when processing menus with unique fonts, background images, and low image resolutions. Using it is as simple as making an API call:

#Python 3.6
import boto3
textract_client = boto3.client( 'textract', region_name = '' #insert the AWS region you're working in
)
textract_response = textract_client.detect_document_text( Document={ 'S3Object': { 'Bucket': '', #insert the name of the S3 bucket containing your image 'Name': '' #insert the S3 key of your image } }
) print(textract_response)

The following code is the Amazon Textract output for a sample image:

{'DocumentMetadata': {'Pages': 1}, 'Blocks': [{'BlockType': 'PAGE', 'Geometry': {'BoundingBox': {'Width': 1.0, 'Height': 1.0, 'Left': 0.0, 'Top': 0.0}, ... {'BlockType': 'WORD', 'Text': 'Dim', 'Geometry': {'BoundingBox': {'Width': 0.10242128372192383, 'Height': 0. 048968635499477386, 'Left': 0. 24052166938781738, 'Top': 0. 02556285448372364},
... 

The raw outputs are visualized by overlaying them on top of the image. The following image visualizes the preceding raw output. The black boxes are the text-detection bounding boxes provided by Amazon Textract. Extracted text is displayed on the right. Note the unconventional fonts, colors, and images on this menu.

The following image visualizes Amazon Textract outputs for a menu with a different design. Black boxes are the text-detection bounding boxes provided by Amazon Textract. Extracted text is displayed on the right. Again, this menu has unconventional fonts, colors, and images.

Using Amazon SageMaker to build a menu structure detector

The next component of this solution was to group the detections from Amazon Textract by menu section. This enabled our search engine to distinguish between entrees, desserts, beverages, and so on. We framed this as a computer vision problem—object detection, to be precise—and used Amazon SageMaker Ground Truth to collect training data. Ground Truth accelerated this process by providing a fully managed annotation tool that we customized to ask human annotators to draw bounding boxes around every menu section in the image. We used an annotation workforce from AWS Marketplace because this was a niche labeling task, and public labelers from Amazon Mechanical Turk didn’t perform well. With Ground Truth, it took just a few days and approximately $1,400 to label 4,086 images with triplicate redundancy.

With labeled data in hand, we faced a paradox of choice when selecting model-building approaches because object detection is such a thoroughly studied problem. Our choices included:

  • Removing low-confidence labels from the labeled dataset – Because even human annotators can make mistakes, Ground Truth calculates confidence scores for labels by having multiple annotators (for this use case, three) label the same image. Setting a higher confidence threshold for labels can decrease the noise in the training data at the expense of having less training data.
  • Data augmentation – Techniques for image data augmentation include horizontal flipping, cropping, shearing, and rotation. Data augmentation can make models more robust by increasing the amount of training data. However, excessive data augmentation may result in poor model convergence.
  • Feature engineering – From our experience in applying computer vision to processing menus, we had a variety of techniques in mind to emphasize or de-emphasize various aspects of the input images. For example, see the following images.

The following is the original image of a menu.

The following image shows the redacted image (overlay white boxes on a black background where text detections were found).

The following is a text cropped image. On a black background, the image has overlay crops from the original image where text detections were found.

The following is a single channel and text cropped image. The image is encoded as a single RGB channel (for this image, green). You can apply this with other transformations, in this case text cropping.

 

We also had the following additional model-building methods to choose from:

  • Model architectures like YOLO, SSD, and RCNN, with VGG or ResNet backbones – Each architecture has different trade-offs of model accuracy, inference time, model size, and more. For this use case, model accuracy was the most important metric because menu images were batch processed.
  • Using a model pre-trained on a general object detection task or starting from scratch – Transfer learning can be helpful when training complex models on small datasets. However, the task of detecting menu sections is very different from a general object detection task (for example, PASCAL VOC), so the pre-training may not be relevant.
  • Optimizer parameters – These include learning rate, momentum, regularization coefficients, and early stopping configuration.

With so many hyperparameters to consider, we turned to the automatic tuning feature of Amazon SageMaker to coordinate a massive tuning job across all these variables. The following code is an example of tuning a single model architecture and input data configuration:

import sagemaker
import boto3
from sagemaker.amazon.amazon_estimator import get_image_uri
from sagemaker.estimator import Estimator
from sagemaker.tuner import HyperparameterTuner, IntegerParameter, CategoricalParameter, ContinuousParameter
import itertools
from time import sleep #set to the region you're working in
REGION_NAME = ''
#set a S3 path for SageMaker to store the outputs of the training jobs S3_OUTPUT_PATH = ''
#set a S3 location for your training dataset, #assumed to be an augmented manifest file
#see: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/sagemaker/latest/dg/augmented-manifest.html
TRAIN_DATA_LOCATION = ''
#set a S3 location for your validation data, #assumed to be an augmented manifest file
VAL_DATA_LOCATION = ''
#specify which fields in the augmented manifest file are relevant for training
DATA_ATTRIBUTE_NAMES = [,]
#specify image shape
IMAGE_SHAPE = #specify label width
LABEL_WIDTH = #specify number of samples in the training dataset
NUM_TRAINING_SAMPLES = sgm_role = sagemaker.get_execution_role()
boto_session = boto3.session.Session( region_name = REGION_NAME
)
sgm_session = sagemaker.Session( boto_session = boto_session
)
training_image = get_image_uri( region_name = REGION_NAME, repo_name = 'object-detection', repo_version = 'latest'
) #set training job configuration
object_detection_estimator = Estimator( image_name = training_image, role = sgm_role, train_instance_count = 1, train_instance_type = 'ml.p3.2xlarge', train_volume_size = 50, train_max_run = 360000, input_mode = 'Pipe', output_path = S3_OUTPUT_PATH, sagemaker_session = sgm_session
) #set input data configuration
train_data = sagemaker.session.s3_input( s3_data = TRAIN_DATA_LOCATION, distribution = 'FullyReplicated', record_wrapping = 'RecordIO', s3_data_type = 'AugmentedManifestFile', attribute_names = DATA_ATTRIBUTE_NAMES
) val_data = sagemaker.session.s3_input( s3_data = VAL_DATA_LOCATION, distribution = 'FullyReplicated', record_wrapping = 'RecordIO', s3_data_type = 'AugmentedManifestFile', attribute_names = DATA_ATTRIBUTE_NAMES
) data_channels = { 'train': train_data, 'validation' : val_data
} #set static hyperparameters
#see: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/sagemaker/latest/dg/object-detection-api-config.html
static_hyperparameters = { 'num_classes' : 1, 'epochs' : 100, 'lr_scheduler_step' : '15,30', 'lr_scheduler_factor' : 0.1, 'overlap_threshold' : 0.5, 'nms_threshold' : 0.45, 'image_shape' : IMAGE_SHAPE, 'label_width' : LABEL_WIDTH, 'num_training_samples' : NUM_TRAINING_SAMPLES, 'early_stopping' : True, 'early_stopping_min_epochs' : 5, 'early_stopping_patience' : 1, 'early_stopping_tolerance' : 0.05,
} #set ranges for tunable hyperparameters
hyperparameter_ranges = { 'learning_rate': ContinuousParameter( min_value = 1e-5, max_value = 1e-2, scaling_type = 'Auto' ), 'mini_batch_size': IntegerParameter( min_value = 8, max_value = 64, scaling_type = 'Auto' )
} #Not all hyperparameters are feasible to tune directly
#see: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/sagemaker/latest/dg/object-detection-tuning.html
#For these we run model tuning jobs in parallel using a for loop
#We take this approach for tuning over different model architectures #and different feature engineering configurations
use_pretrained_options = [0, 1]
base_network_options = ['resnet-50', 'vgg-16'] for use_pretrained, base_network in itertools.product(use_pretrained_options, base_network_options): static_hyperparameter_configuration = { **static_hyperparameters, 'use_pretrained_model' : use_pretrained, 'base_network' : base_network } object_detection_estimator.set_hyperparameters( **static_hyperparameter_configuration ) tuner = HyperparameterTuner( estimator = object_detection_estimator, objective_metric_name = 'validation:mAP', strategy = 'Bayesian', hyperparameter_ranges = hyperparameter_ranges, max_jobs = 24, max_parallel_jobs = 2, early_stopping_type = 'Auto', ) tuner.fit( inputs = data_channels ) print(f'Started tuning job: {tuner.latest_tuning_job.name}') #wait a bit before starting next job so auto generated names don't conflict sleep(60)

This code uses version 1.72.0 of the Amazon SageMaker Python SDK, which is the default version installed in Amazon SageMaker notebook instances. Version 2.X introduces breaking changes. For more information, see Use Version 2.x of the SageMaker Python SDK.

We used powerful GPU hardware (p3.2xlarge instances), and it took us just 1 week and approximately $1,500 to explore 455 unique parameter configurations. Of these configurations, Amazon SageMaker found that a fine-tuned Faster R-CNN model with text cropping performed the best, with a mean average precision score of 0.93. This aligned with results from our prior work in this space, which found that two-stage detectors generally outperform single-stage detectors in processing menus.

The following is an example of how the object detection model processed a menu. In this image, the purple boxes are the predicted bounding boxes from the menu section detection model. Black boxes are the text detection bounding boxes provided by Amazon Textract.

Using Amazon SageMaker to build rule- and ML-based text classifiers

The final component in the solution was a layer of text classification. To enable our enhanced search functionality, we had to know if each detection within a menu section was the menu section title, name of a dish, price of a dish, or something else (such as a description of a dish or the name of the restaurant). To this end, we developed a hybrid rule- and ML-based text classification system.

The first step of the classification was to use a rule to determine if a detection was a price or not. This rule simply calculated the proportion of numeric characters in the detection. If the proportion was greater than 40%, the detection was classified as a price. Although simple, this classifier worked well in practice. We used Amazon SageMaker notebook instances as a convenient interactive environment to develop this and other rules.

After the prices were filtered out, the remaining detections were classified as dish or not dish. From our experience in processing menus, we intuitively knew that in many cases, the location of prices was sufficient to do this classification. For these menus, dishes and prices are listed side by side, so simply classifying detections located to the left of prices as dishes worked well.

The following example shows how the rules-based text classification system processed a menu. Green boxes are detections classified as dishes (by the price location rule). Red boxes are detections classified as not dishes (by the price location rule). Blue boxes are detections classified as prices. Final dish detections are on the right.

Some menus might include lengthy dish descriptions or may not list prices next to individual dishes. These menus violate the assumptions of the price location rules, so we turned to model-based text classification. We used Amazon SageMaker training jobs to experiment with many modeling approaches in parallel, including an XGBoost model trained on hashed word count vectors. In the end, we found that a fine-tuned BERT model from GluonNLP achieved the best performance with an AUROC score of 0.86.

The following image is an example of how the model-based text classification system processed a menu. Green boxes are detections classified as dishes (by the BERT model). Red boxes are detections classified as not dishes (by the BERT model). Blue boxes are detections classified as prices. The final dish detections are on the right.

Of the remaining detections (those not classified as prices or dishes), a final round of classification identified menu section titles. We created features that captured the font size of the detection, the location of the detection on the menu, and the length of the words within the detection. We used these features as inputs to a logistic regression model that predicted if a detection is a menu section title or not.

Key features of Amazon SageMaker

In the end, we found that doing OCR was as simple as making an API call to Amazon Textract. However, our use case required additional customization. We selected Amazon SageMaker as an ML platform to develop this customization because it offered several key features:

  • Amazon SageMaker Notebooks made it easy to spin up Jupyter notebook environments for prototyping and testing rules and models.
  • Ground Truth helped us build and deploy a custom image annotation tool with no front-end experience required.
  • Amazon SageMaker automatic tuning enabled us to run massive hyperparameter tuning jobs on powerful hardware, and included an intuitive interface for tracking the results of hundreds of experiments. You can implement tuning jobs with early stopping conditions, which makes experimentation cost-effective.

Amazon SageMaker offers additional integration benefits from including all the preceding features in a single platform:

  • Amazon SageMaker Notebooks come pre-installed with all the dependencies needed to build models that can be optimized with automatic tuning.
  • Ground Truth offers easy access to labelers from Mechanical Turk or AWS Marketplace.
  • Automatic tuning can directly ingest the manifest files created by Amazon SageMaker Ground Truth.

Putting it all together

Our menu digitization system can extract text from images of menus, group it by menu section, extract the title of the section, extract the dishes within each section, and pair each dish with its price. The following is a visualization of the end-to-end solution.

The workflow contains the following steps:

  1. The input is an image of a menu.
  2. Amazon Textract performs OCR on the input image.
  3. An ML-based computer vision model predicts bounding boxes for menu sections in the menu image.
  4. A rules-based classifier classifies Amazon Textract detections as price or not price.
  5. A rules-based classifier (5a) attempts to use the location of price detections to classify the not price detections as dish or not dish. If this rule doesn’t successfully classify most of the detections on the page, an ML-based classifier is used instead (5b).
  6. The ML-based classifier uses hand-crafted features to classify not dish detections as menu section title or not menu section title.
  7.  The menu text is structured by combining the menu section detections and the text classification results.

The following image visualizes a sample output of the system. Green boxes are detections classified as dishes. Blue boxes are detections classified as prices. Yellow boxes are detections classified as menu section titles. Purple boxes are predicted menu section bounding boxes.

The following code is the structured output:

[ { "title":{ "text":"Shrimp Dishes" }, "dishes":[ { "text":"Shrimp Masala", "price":{ "text":"140" } }, { "text":"Shrimp Biryani", "price":{ "text":"170" } }, { "text":"Shrimp Pulav", "price":{ "text":"160" } } ] }, ...
]

Conclusion

We built a system that uses ML to digitize menus without any human input required. This system will improve user experience by powering new features such as advanced dish search and review highlight verification. Our content team will also use it to accelerate creating menus for online ordering.

To explore these capabilities of Amazon Textract and Amazon SageMaker in more depth, see Automatically extract text and structured data from documents with Amazon Textract and Amazon SageMaker Automatic Model Tuning: Using Machine Learning for Machine Learning.

The Amazon ML Solutions Lab helped us accelerate our use of ML by pairing our team with ML experts. The ML Solutions Lab brings to every customer engagement learnings from more than 20 years of Amazon’s ML innovations in areas such as fulfillment and logistics, personalization and recommendations, computer vision and translation, fraud prevention, forecasting, and supply chain optimization. To learn more about the AWS ML Solutions Lab, contact your account manager or visit Amazon Machine Learning Solutions Lab.


About the Authors

Chiranjeev Ghai is a Machine Learning Engineer. In his current role, he has been aiding automation at zomato by leveraging a wide variety of ML optimisations ranging from Image Classification, Product Recommendation, and Text Detection. When not building models, he likes to spend his time playing video games at home.

Ryan Cheng is a Deep Learning Architect in the Amazon ML Solutions Lab. He has worked on a wide range of ML use cases from sports analytics to optical character recognition. In his spare time, Ryan enjoys cooking.

Andrew Ang is a Deep Learning Architect at the Amazon ML Solutions Lab, where he helps AWS customers identify and build AI/ML solutions to address their business problems.

Vinayak Arannil is a Data Scientist at the Amazon Machine Learning Solutions Lab. He has worked on various domains of data science like computer vision, natural language processing, recommendation systems, etc.

Source: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/machine-learning/zomato-digitizes-menus-using-amazon-textract-and-amazon-sagemaker/

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zomato digitizes menus using Amazon Textract and Amazon SageMaker

This post is co-written by Chiranjeev Ghai, ML Engineer at zomato. zomato is a global food-tech company based in India. Are you the kind of person who has very specific cravings? Maybe when the mood hits, you don’t want just any kind of Indian food—you want Chicken Chettinad with a side of paratha, and nothing […]

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This post is co-written by Chiranjeev Ghai, ML Engineer at zomato. zomato is a global food-tech company based in India.

Are you the kind of person who has very specific cravings? Maybe when the mood hits, you don’t want just any kind of Indian food—you want Chicken Chettinad with a side of paratha, and nothing else will hit the spot! To help picky eaters satisfy their cravings, we at zomato have recently added enhanced search engine capabilities to our restaurant aggregation and food delivery platform. These capabilities enable us to recommend restaurants to zomato users based on searches for specific dishes.

We power this functionality with machine learning (ML), using it to extract and structure text data from menu images. To develop this menu digitization technology, we partnered with Amazon ML Solutions Lab to explore the capabilities of the AWS ML Stack. This post summarizes how we used Amazon Textract and Amazon SageMaker to develop a customized menu digitization solution.

Extracting raw text from menus with Amazon Textract

The first component of this solution was to accurately extract all the text in the menu image. This process is known as optical character recognition (OCR). For our use case, we experimented with both in-house and commercial OCR solutions.

We first created an in-house OCR solution by stacking a pre-trained text detection model and a pre-trained text recognition model. The challenge with these models was that they were trained on a standard text dataset that didn’t match the eclectic fonts found in restaurant menus. To improve system performance, we fine-tuned these models by generating a dataset of 1.5 million synthetic text images that were more representative of text in menus.

After evaluating our in-house solution and several commercial OCR solutions, we found that Amazon Textract offers the best text recognition precision and recall. Restaurants often get creative when designing their menus, so OCR robustness was crucial for this use case. Amazon Textract particularly differentiated itself when processing menus with unique fonts, background images, and low image resolutions. Using it is as simple as making an API call:

#Python 3.6
import boto3
textract_client = boto3.client( 'textract', region_name = '' #insert the AWS region you're working in
)
textract_response = textract_client.detect_document_text( Document={ 'S3Object': { 'Bucket': '', #insert the name of the S3 bucket containing your image 'Name': '' #insert the S3 key of your image } }
) print(textract_response)

The following code is the Amazon Textract output for a sample image:

{'DocumentMetadata': {'Pages': 1}, 'Blocks': [{'BlockType': 'PAGE', 'Geometry': {'BoundingBox': {'Width': 1.0, 'Height': 1.0, 'Left': 0.0, 'Top': 0.0}, ... {'BlockType': 'WORD', 'Text': 'Dim', 'Geometry': {'BoundingBox': {'Width': 0.10242128372192383, 'Height': 0. 048968635499477386, 'Left': 0. 24052166938781738, 'Top': 0. 02556285448372364},
... 

The raw outputs are visualized by overlaying them on top of the image. The following image visualizes the preceding raw output. The black boxes are the text-detection bounding boxes provided by Amazon Textract. Extracted text is displayed on the right. Note the unconventional fonts, colors, and images on this menu.

The following image visualizes Amazon Textract outputs for a menu with a different design. Black boxes are the text-detection bounding boxes provided by Amazon Textract. Extracted text is displayed on the right. Again, this menu has unconventional fonts, colors, and images.

Using Amazon SageMaker to build a menu structure detector

The next component of this solution was to group the detections from Amazon Textract by menu section. This enabled our search engine to distinguish between entrees, desserts, beverages, and so on. We framed this as a computer vision problem—object detection, to be precise—and used Amazon SageMaker Ground Truth to collect training data. Ground Truth accelerated this process by providing a fully managed annotation tool that we customized to ask human annotators to draw bounding boxes around every menu section in the image. We used an annotation workforce from AWS Marketplace because this was a niche labeling task, and public labelers from Amazon Mechanical Turk didn’t perform well. With Ground Truth, it took just a few days and approximately $1,400 to label 4,086 images with triplicate redundancy.

With labeled data in hand, we faced a paradox of choice when selecting model-building approaches because object detection is such a thoroughly studied problem. Our choices included:

  • Removing low-confidence labels from the labeled dataset – Because even human annotators can make mistakes, Ground Truth calculates confidence scores for labels by having multiple annotators (for this use case, three) label the same image. Setting a higher confidence threshold for labels can decrease the noise in the training data at the expense of having less training data.
  • Data augmentation – Techniques for image data augmentation include horizontal flipping, cropping, shearing, and rotation. Data augmentation can make models more robust by increasing the amount of training data. However, excessive data augmentation may result in poor model convergence.
  • Feature engineering – From our experience in applying computer vision to processing menus, we had a variety of techniques in mind to emphasize or de-emphasize various aspects of the input images. For example, see the following images.

The following is the original image of a menu.

The following image shows the redacted image (overlay white boxes on a black background where text detections were found).

The following is a text cropped image. On a black background, the image has overlay crops from the original image where text detections were found.

The following is a single channel and text cropped image. The image is encoded as a single RGB channel (for this image, green). You can apply this with other transformations, in this case text cropping.

 

We also had the following additional model-building methods to choose from:

  • Model architectures like YOLO, SSD, and RCNN, with VGG or ResNet backbones – Each architecture has different trade-offs of model accuracy, inference time, model size, and more. For this use case, model accuracy was the most important metric because menu images were batch processed.
  • Using a model pre-trained on a general object detection task or starting from scratch – Transfer learning can be helpful when training complex models on small datasets. However, the task of detecting menu sections is very different from a general object detection task (for example, PASCAL VOC), so the pre-training may not be relevant.
  • Optimizer parameters – These include learning rate, momentum, regularization coefficients, and early stopping configuration.

With so many hyperparameters to consider, we turned to the automatic tuning feature of Amazon SageMaker to coordinate a massive tuning job across all these variables. The following code is an example of tuning a single model architecture and input data configuration:

import sagemaker
import boto3
from sagemaker.amazon.amazon_estimator import get_image_uri
from sagemaker.estimator import Estimator
from sagemaker.tuner import HyperparameterTuner, IntegerParameter, CategoricalParameter, ContinuousParameter
import itertools
from time import sleep #set to the region you're working in
REGION_NAME = ''
#set a S3 path for SageMaker to store the outputs of the training jobs S3_OUTPUT_PATH = ''
#set a S3 location for your training dataset, #assumed to be an augmented manifest file
#see: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/sagemaker/latest/dg/augmented-manifest.html
TRAIN_DATA_LOCATION = ''
#set a S3 location for your validation data, #assumed to be an augmented manifest file
VAL_DATA_LOCATION = ''
#specify which fields in the augmented manifest file are relevant for training
DATA_ATTRIBUTE_NAMES = [,]
#specify image shape
IMAGE_SHAPE = #specify label width
LABEL_WIDTH = #specify number of samples in the training dataset
NUM_TRAINING_SAMPLES = sgm_role = sagemaker.get_execution_role()
boto_session = boto3.session.Session( region_name = REGION_NAME
)
sgm_session = sagemaker.Session( boto_session = boto_session
)
training_image = get_image_uri( region_name = REGION_NAME, repo_name = 'object-detection', repo_version = 'latest'
) #set training job configuration
object_detection_estimator = Estimator( image_name = training_image, role = sgm_role, train_instance_count = 1, train_instance_type = 'ml.p3.2xlarge', train_volume_size = 50, train_max_run = 360000, input_mode = 'Pipe', output_path = S3_OUTPUT_PATH, sagemaker_session = sgm_session
) #set input data configuration
train_data = sagemaker.session.s3_input( s3_data = TRAIN_DATA_LOCATION, distribution = 'FullyReplicated', record_wrapping = 'RecordIO', s3_data_type = 'AugmentedManifestFile', attribute_names = DATA_ATTRIBUTE_NAMES
) val_data = sagemaker.session.s3_input( s3_data = VAL_DATA_LOCATION, distribution = 'FullyReplicated', record_wrapping = 'RecordIO', s3_data_type = 'AugmentedManifestFile', attribute_names = DATA_ATTRIBUTE_NAMES
) data_channels = { 'train': train_data, 'validation' : val_data
} #set static hyperparameters
#see: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/sagemaker/latest/dg/object-detection-api-config.html
static_hyperparameters = { 'num_classes' : 1, 'epochs' : 100, 'lr_scheduler_step' : '15,30', 'lr_scheduler_factor' : 0.1, 'overlap_threshold' : 0.5, 'nms_threshold' : 0.45, 'image_shape' : IMAGE_SHAPE, 'label_width' : LABEL_WIDTH, 'num_training_samples' : NUM_TRAINING_SAMPLES, 'early_stopping' : True, 'early_stopping_min_epochs' : 5, 'early_stopping_patience' : 1, 'early_stopping_tolerance' : 0.05,
} #set ranges for tunable hyperparameters
hyperparameter_ranges = { 'learning_rate': ContinuousParameter( min_value = 1e-5, max_value = 1e-2, scaling_type = 'Auto' ), 'mini_batch_size': IntegerParameter( min_value = 8, max_value = 64, scaling_type = 'Auto' )
} #Not all hyperparameters are feasible to tune directly
#see: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/sagemaker/latest/dg/object-detection-tuning.html
#For these we run model tuning jobs in parallel using a for loop
#We take this approach for tuning over different model architectures #and different feature engineering configurations
use_pretrained_options = [0, 1]
base_network_options = ['resnet-50', 'vgg-16'] for use_pretrained, base_network in itertools.product(use_pretrained_options, base_network_options): static_hyperparameter_configuration = { **static_hyperparameters, 'use_pretrained_model' : use_pretrained, 'base_network' : base_network } object_detection_estimator.set_hyperparameters( **static_hyperparameter_configuration ) tuner = HyperparameterTuner( estimator = object_detection_estimator, objective_metric_name = 'validation:mAP', strategy = 'Bayesian', hyperparameter_ranges = hyperparameter_ranges, max_jobs = 24, max_parallel_jobs = 2, early_stopping_type = 'Auto', ) tuner.fit( inputs = data_channels ) print(f'Started tuning job: {tuner.latest_tuning_job.name}') #wait a bit before starting next job so auto generated names don't conflict sleep(60)

This code uses version 1.72.0 of the Amazon SageMaker Python SDK, which is the default version installed in Amazon SageMaker notebook instances. Version 2.X introduces breaking changes. For more information, see Use Version 2.x of the SageMaker Python SDK.

We used powerful GPU hardware (p3.2xlarge instances), and it took us just 1 week and approximately $1,500 to explore 455 unique parameter configurations. Of these configurations, Amazon SageMaker found that a fine-tuned Faster R-CNN model with text cropping performed the best, with a mean average precision score of 0.93. This aligned with results from our prior work in this space, which found that two-stage detectors generally outperform single-stage detectors in processing menus.

The following is an example of how the object detection model processed a menu. In this image, the purple boxes are the predicted bounding boxes from the menu section detection model. Black boxes are the text detection bounding boxes provided by Amazon Textract.

Using Amazon SageMaker to build rule- and ML-based text classifiers

The final component in the solution was a layer of text classification. To enable our enhanced search functionality, we had to know if each detection within a menu section was the menu section title, name of a dish, price of a dish, or something else (such as a description of a dish or the name of the restaurant). To this end, we developed a hybrid rule- and ML-based text classification system.

The first step of the classification was to use a rule to determine if a detection was a price or not. This rule simply calculated the proportion of numeric characters in the detection. If the proportion was greater than 40%, the detection was classified as a price. Although simple, this classifier worked well in practice. We used Amazon SageMaker notebook instances as a convenient interactive environment to develop this and other rules.

After the prices were filtered out, the remaining detections were classified as dish or not dish. From our experience in processing menus, we intuitively knew that in many cases, the location of prices was sufficient to do this classification. For these menus, dishes and prices are listed side by side, so simply classifying detections located to the left of prices as dishes worked well.

The following example shows how the rules-based text classification system processed a menu. Green boxes are detections classified as dishes (by the price location rule). Red boxes are detections classified as not dishes (by the price location rule). Blue boxes are detections classified as prices. Final dish detections are on the right.

Some menus might include lengthy dish descriptions or may not list prices next to individual dishes. These menus violate the assumptions of the price location rules, so we turned to model-based text classification. We used Amazon SageMaker training jobs to experiment with many modeling approaches in parallel, including an XGBoost model trained on hashed word count vectors. In the end, we found that a fine-tuned BERT model from GluonNLP achieved the best performance with an AUROC score of 0.86.

The following image is an example of how the model-based text classification system processed a menu. Green boxes are detections classified as dishes (by the BERT model). Red boxes are detections classified as not dishes (by the BERT model). Blue boxes are detections classified as prices. The final dish detections are on the right.

Of the remaining detections (those not classified as prices or dishes), a final round of classification identified menu section titles. We created features that captured the font size of the detection, the location of the detection on the menu, and the length of the words within the detection. We used these features as inputs to a logistic regression model that predicted if a detection is a menu section title or not.

Key features of Amazon SageMaker

In the end, we found that doing OCR was as simple as making an API call to Amazon Textract. However, our use case required additional customization. We selected Amazon SageMaker as an ML platform to develop this customization because it offered several key features:

  • Amazon SageMaker Notebooks made it easy to spin up Jupyter notebook environments for prototyping and testing rules and models.
  • Ground Truth helped us build and deploy a custom image annotation tool with no front-end experience required.
  • Amazon SageMaker automatic tuning enabled us to run massive hyperparameter tuning jobs on powerful hardware, and included an intuitive interface for tracking the results of hundreds of experiments. You can implement tuning jobs with early stopping conditions, which makes experimentation cost-effective.

Amazon SageMaker offers additional integration benefits from including all the preceding features in a single platform:

  • Amazon SageMaker Notebooks come pre-installed with all the dependencies needed to build models that can be optimized with automatic tuning.
  • Ground Truth offers easy access to labelers from Mechanical Turk or AWS Marketplace.
  • Automatic tuning can directly ingest the manifest files created by Amazon SageMaker Ground Truth.

Putting it all together

Our menu digitization system can extract text from images of menus, group it by menu section, extract the title of the section, extract the dishes within each section, and pair each dish with its price. The following is a visualization of the end-to-end solution.

The workflow contains the following steps:

  1. The input is an image of a menu.
  2. Amazon Textract performs OCR on the input image.
  3. An ML-based computer vision model predicts bounding boxes for menu sections in the menu image.
  4. A rules-based classifier classifies Amazon Textract detections as price or not price.
  5. A rules-based classifier (5a) attempts to use the location of price detections to classify the not price detections as dish or not dish. If this rule doesn’t successfully classify most of the detections on the page, an ML-based classifier is used instead (5b).
  6. The ML-based classifier uses hand-crafted features to classify not dish detections as menu section title or not menu section title.
  7.  The menu text is structured by combining the menu section detections and the text classification results.

The following image visualizes a sample output of the system. Green boxes are detections classified as dishes. Blue boxes are detections classified as prices. Yellow boxes are detections classified as menu section titles. Purple boxes are predicted menu section bounding boxes.

The following code is the structured output:

[ { "title":{ "text":"Shrimp Dishes" }, "dishes":[ { "text":"Shrimp Masala", "price":{ "text":"140" } }, { "text":"Shrimp Biryani", "price":{ "text":"170" } }, { "text":"Shrimp Pulav", "price":{ "text":"160" } } ] }, ...
]

Conclusion

We built a system that uses ML to digitize menus without any human input required. This system will improve user experience by powering new features such as advanced dish search and review highlight verification. Our content team will also use it to accelerate creating menus for online ordering.

To explore these capabilities of Amazon Textract and Amazon SageMaker in more depth, see Automatically extract text and structured data from documents with Amazon Textract and Amazon SageMaker Automatic Model Tuning: Using Machine Learning for Machine Learning.

The Amazon ML Solutions Lab helped us accelerate our use of ML by pairing our team with ML experts. The ML Solutions Lab brings to every customer engagement learnings from more than 20 years of Amazon’s ML innovations in areas such as fulfillment and logistics, personalization and recommendations, computer vision and translation, fraud prevention, forecasting, and supply chain optimization. To learn more about the AWS ML Solutions Lab, contact your account manager or visit Amazon Machine Learning Solutions Lab.


About the Authors

Chiranjeev Ghai is a Machine Learning Engineer. In his current role, he has been aiding automation at zomato by leveraging a wide variety of ML optimisations ranging from Image Classification, Product Recommendation, and Text Detection. When not building models, he likes to spend his time playing video games at home.

Ryan Cheng is a Deep Learning Architect in the Amazon ML Solutions Lab. He has worked on a wide range of ML use cases from sports analytics to optical character recognition. In his spare time, Ryan enjoys cooking.

Andrew Ang is a Deep Learning Architect at the Amazon ML Solutions Lab, where he helps AWS customers identify and build AI/ML solutions to address their business problems.

Vinayak Arannil is a Data Scientist at the Amazon Machine Learning Solutions Lab. He has worked on various domains of data science like computer vision, natural language processing, recommendation systems, etc.

Source: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/machine-learning/zomato-digitizes-menus-using-amazon-textract-and-amazon-sagemaker/

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