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Using speaker diarization for streaming transcription with Amazon Transcribe and Amazon Transcribe Medical

Conversational audio data that requires transcription, such as phone calls, doctor visits, and online meetings, often has multiple speakers. In these use cases, it’s important to accurately label the speaker and associate them to the audio content delivered. For example, you can distinguish between a doctor’s questions and a patient’s responses in the transcription of […]

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Conversational audio data that requires transcription, such as phone calls, doctor visits, and online meetings, often has multiple speakers. In these use cases, it’s important to accurately label the speaker and associate them to the audio content delivered. For example, you can distinguish between a doctor’s questions and a patient’s responses in the transcription of a live medical consultation.

Amazon Transcribe is an automatic speech recognition (ASR) service that makes it easy for developers to add speech-to-text capability to applications. With the launch of speaker diarization for streaming transcriptions, you can use Amazon Transcribe and Amazon Transcribe Medical to label the different speakers in real-time customer service calls, conference calls, live broadcasts, or clinical visits. Speaker diarziation or speaker labeling is critical to creating accurate transcription because of its ability to distinguish what each speaker said. This is typically represented by speaker A and speaker B. Speaker identification usually refers to when the speakers are specifically identified as Sally or Alfonso. With speaker diarization, you can request Amazon Transcribe and Amazon Transcribe Medical to accurately label up to five speakers in an audio stream. Although Amazon Transcribe can label more than five speakers in a stream, the accuracy of speaker diarization decreases if you exceed that number. In some cases, the different speakers may be on different channels (e.g. Call Center). In those cases you can use Amazon Transcribe Channel Identification to separate multiple channels from within a live audio stream to generate transcripts that label each audio channel

This post uses an example application to show you how to use the AWS SDK for Java to start a stream that enables you to stream your conversational audio from your microphone to Amazon Transcribe, and receive transcripts in real time with speaker labeling. The solution is a Java application that you can use to transcribe streaming audio from multiple speakers in real time. The application labels each speaker in the transcription results, which can be exported.

You can find the application in the GitHub repo. We include detailed steps to set up and run the application in this post.

Prerequisites

You need an AWS account to proceed with the solution. Additionally, the AmazonTranscribeFullAccess policy is attached to the AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) role you use for this demo. To create an IAM role with the necessary permissions, complete the following steps:

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console and open the IAM console.
  2. On the navigation pane, under Access management, choose Roles.
  3. You can use an existing IAM role to create and run transcription jobs, or choose Create role.
  4. Under Common use cases, choose EC2. You can select any use case, but EC2 is one of the most straightforward ones.
  5. Choose Next: Permissions.
  6. For the policy name, enter AmazonTranscribeFullAccess.
  7. Choose Next: Tags.
  8. Choose Next: Review.
  9. For Role name, enter a role name.
  10. Remove the text under Role description.
  11. Choose Create role.
  12. Choose the role you created.
  13. Choose Trust relationships.
  14. Choose Edit trust relationship.
  15. Replace the trust policy text in your role with the following code:
{"Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ {"Effect": "Allow", "Principal": {"Service": "transcribe.amazonaws.com" }, "Action": "sts:AssumeRole" } ]
} 

Solution overview

Amazon Transcribe streaming transcription enables you to send a live audio stream to Amazon Transcribe and receive a stream of text in real time. You can label different speakers in either HTTP/2 or Websocket streams. Speaker diarization works best for labeling between two and five speakers. Although Amazon Transcribe can label more than five speakers in a stream, the accuracy of speaker separation decreases if you exceed five speakers.

To start an HTTP/2 stream, we specify the ShowSpeakerLabel request parameter of the StartStreamTranscription operation in our demo solution. See the following code:

 private StartStreamTranscriptionRequest getRequest(Integer mediaSampleRateHertz) { return StartStreamTranscriptionRequest.builder() .languageCode(LanguageCode.EN_US.toString()) .mediaEncoding(MediaEncoding.PCM) .mediaSampleRateHertz(mediaSampleRateHertz) .showSpeakerLabel(true) .build(); }

Amazon Transcribe streaming returns a “result” object as part of the transcription response element that can be used to label the speakers in the transcript. To learn more about the parameters in this result object, see Response Syntax.

"TranscriptEvent": { "Transcript": { "Results": [ { "Alternatives": [ { "Items": [ { "Content": "string", "EndTime": number, "Speaker": "string", "StartTime": number, "Type": "string", "VocabularyFilterMatch": boolean } ], "Transcript": "string" } ], "EndTime": number, "IsPartial": boolean, "ResultId": "string", "StartTime": number } ] } }

Our solution demonstrates speaker diarization during transcription for real-time audio captured via the microphone. Amazon Transcribe breaks your incoming audio stream based on natural speech segments, such as a change in speaker or a pause in the audio. The transcription is returned progressively to your application, with each response containing more transcribed speech until the entire segment is transcribed. For more information, see Identifying Speakers.

Launching the application

Complete the following prerequisites to launch the Java application. If you already have JavaFX or Java and Maven installed, you can skip the first two sections (Installing JavaFX and Installing Maven). For all environment variables mentioned in the following steps, a good option is to add it to the ~/.bashrc file and apply these variables as required by typing “source ~/.bashrc” after you open a shell.

Installing JDK

As your first step, download and install Java SE. When the installation is complete, set the JAVA_HOME variable (see the following code). Make sure to select the path to the correct Java version and confirm the path is valid.

export JAVA_HOME=path-to-your-install-dir/jdk-14.0.2.jdk/Contents/Home

Installing JavaFX

For instructions on downloading and installing JavaFX, see Getting Started with JavaFX. Set up the environment variable as described in the instructions or by entering for following code (replace path/to with the directory where you installed JavaFX):

export PATH_TO_FX='path/to/javafx-sdk-14/lib'

Test your JavaFX installation as shown in the sample application on GitHub.

Installing Maven

Download the latest version of Apache Maven. For installation instructions, see Installing Apache Maven.

Installing the AWS CLI (Optional)

As an optional step, you can install the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI). For instructions, see Installing, updating, and uninstalling the AWS CLI version 2. You can use the AWS CLI to validate and troubleshoot the solution as needed.

Setting up AWS access

Lastly, set up your access key and secret access key required for programmatic access to AWS. For instructions, see Programmatic access. Choose a Region closest to your location. For more information, see the Amazon Transcribe Streaming section in Service Endpoints.

When you know the Region and access keys, open a terminal window in your computer and assign them to environment variables for access within our solution:

  • export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=<access-key>
  • export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=<secret-access-key>
  • export AWS_REGION=<aws region>

Solution demonstration

The following video demonstrates how you can compile and run the Java application presented in this post. Use the following sections to walk through these steps yourself.

The quality of the transcription results depends on many factors. For example, the quality can be affected by artifacts such as background noise, speakers talking over each other, complex technical jargon, the volume disparity between speakers, and the audio recording devices you use. You can use a variety of capabilities provided by Amazon Transcribe to improve transcription quality. For example, you can use custom vocabularies to recognize out-of-lexicon terms. You can even use custom language models, which enables you to use your own data to build domain-specific models. For more information, see Improving Domain-Specific Transcription Accuracy with Custom Language Models.

Setting up the solution

To implement the solution, complete the following steps:

  1. Clone the solution’s GitHub repo in your local computer using the following command:
git clone https://github.com/aws-samples/aws-transcribe-speaker-identification-java

  1. Navigate to the main directory of the solution aws-transcribe-streaming-example-java with the following code:
cd aws-transcribe-streaming-example-java

  1. Compile the source code and build a package for running our solution:
    1. Enter mvn compile. If the compile is successful, you should a BUILD SUCCESS message. If there are errors in compilation, it’s most likely related to JavaFX path issues. Fix the issues based on the instructions in the Installing JavaFX section in this post.
    2. Enter mvn clean package. You should see a BUILD SUCCESS message if everything went well. This command compiles the source files and creates a packaged JAR file that we use to run our solution. If you’re repeating the build exercise, you don’t need to enter mvn compile every time.
  2. Run the solution by entering the following code:
--module-path $PATH_TO_FX --add-modules javafx.controls -jar target/aws-transcribe-sample-application-1.0-SNAPSHOT-jar-with-dependencies.jar

If you receive an error, it’s likely because you already had a version of Java or JavaFX and Maven installed and skipped the steps to install JDK and JavaFX in this post. In so, enter the following code:

java -jar target/aws-transcribe-sample-application-1.0-SNAPSHOT-jar-with-dependencies.jar

You should see a Java UI window open.

Running the demo solution

Follow the steps in this section to run the demo yourself. You need two to five speakers present to try out the speaker diarization functionality. This application requires that all speakers use the same audio input when speaking.

  1. Choose Start Microphone Transcription in the Java UI application.
  2. Use your computer’s microphone to stream audio of two or more people (not more than five) conversing.
  3. As of this writing, Amazon Transcribe speaker labeling supports real-time streams that are in US English

You should see the speaker designations and the corresponding transcript appearing in the In-Progress Transcriptions window as the conversation progresses. When the transcript is complete, it should appear in the Final Transcription window.

  1. Choose Save Full Transcript to store the transcript locally in your computer.

Conclusion

This post demonstrated how you can easily infuse your applications with real-time ASR capabilities using Amazon Transcribe streaming and showcased an important new feature that enables speaker diarization in real-time audio streams.

With Amazon Transcribe and Amazon Transcribe Medical, you can use speaker separation to generate real-time insights from your conversations such as in-clinic visits or customer service calls and send these to downstream applications for natural language processing, or you can send it to human loops for review using Amazon Augmented AI (Amazon A2I). For more information, see Improving speech-to-text transcripts from Amazon Transcribe using custom vocabularies and Amazon Augmented AI.


About the Authors

Prem Ranga is an Enterprise Solutions Architect based out of Houston, Texas. He is part of the Machine Learning Technical Field Community and loves working with customers on their ML and AI journey. Prem is passionate about robotics, is an Autonomous Vehicles researcher, and also built the Alexa-controlled Beer Pours in Houston and other locations.

Talia Chopra is a Technical Writer in AWS specializing in machine learning and artificial intelligence. She works with multiple teams in AWS to create technical documentation and tutorials for customers using Amazon SageMaker, MxNet, and AutoGluon. In her free time, she enjoys meditating, studying machine learning, and taking walks in nature.

Parsa Shahbodaghi is a Technical Writer in AWS specializing in machine learning and artificial intelligence. He writes the technical documentation for Amazon Transcribe and Amazon Transcribe Medical. In his free time, he enjoys meditating, listening to audiobooks, weightlifting, and watching stand-up comedy. He will never be a stand-up comedian, but at least his mom thinks he’s funny.

Mahendar Gajula is a Sr. Data Architect at AWS. He works with AWS customers in their journey to the cloud with a focus on data lake, data warehouse, and AI/ML projects. In his spare time, he enjoys playing tennis and spending time with his family.

Source: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/machine-learning/using-speaker-diarization-for-streaming-transcription-with-amazon-transcribe-and-amazon-transcribe-medical/

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5 Work From Home Office Essentials

Working remotely from home had been increasing in popularity, but it’s now become a necessity for many professionals due to the pandemic. “Some companies are eager to reopen their doors and return to the office, but a large number of employer and employees are making the transitional work environment a permanent change.”  They can’t guarantee […]

The post 5 Work From Home Office Essentials appeared first on Aiiot Talk – Artificial Intelligence | Internet of Things | Technology.

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Working remotely from home had been increasing in popularity, but it’s now become a necessity for many professionals due to the pandemic.

“Some companies are eager to reopen their doors and return to the office, but a large number of employer and employees are making the transitional work environment a permanent change.” 

They can’t guarantee their health and safety in a socially-crowded space, plus, companies are able to save tons of money they would have spent on their commercial lease or mortgage payments.

That’s not the say that working from home doesn’t come at its own costs, however. It can lead to a huge hit in productivity without the right equipment in place. To maximize your performance and efficiency in a remote setting, be sure to purchase these five office essentials.

1. Powerful PC

This one probably feels like an obvious pointer, but let’s knock it off our list. You won’t be able to get by with a make-shift work station and in today’s digital domain, your computer will be at the core of everything you do.

Never-ending loading wheels, delayed downloads, and slow rendering will add seconds to every task you do, so if your company didn’t provide you with a workhorse computer tower, you might look into investing in one yourself, then deduct the cost in your tax return.

Depending on your line of work, it might make more sense to go for a laptop vs a desktop computer. Unless your tasks demand super sophisticated software and large storage space, you can probably get by with a portable PC. That way, when coffee shops begin to reopen and allow patrons to sit inside, you can work on-the-go without feeling tethered to your desk.

2. Ergonomic Office Chair

If you’re looking at a long-term remote situation, it’s worth spending the big bucks on an ergonomic office chair. You should feel comfortably locked into your seat for eight hours a day—at least if you want to concentrate on your workflow, rather than the cramp in your back.

Shop around for an office chair that’s sophisticated in design and specifically built to hold the human body. Some stand-out features you should look out for include:

  • Targeted support around the lumbar spine
  • Adjustable height so you can adjust the seat as necessary for your arms to rest naturally on the keyboard
  • Swivel base to effortlessly turn your body, preventing neck strain
  • Cushioned seat to comfort your tailbone
  • Ventilated fabric that promotes airflow so you don’t feel overheated when sitting in the chair for several hours

You might have to pay a couple of hundred dollars for the best-of-the-line features, but there is another item that might qualify as an eligible tax deduction—just be sure to keep all your receipts organized with a document scanner in case the IRS raises their eyebrows and issues an audit.

3. Wireless Keyboard

If you want to type faster and feel better while you’re at it, then a wireless keyboard is clutch. They enable you to bring the keys closer, decreasing the extension length of your arms and accompanying shoulder strain.

“It also helps reduce the strain on your eyes by moving the bright screen farther away from your direct line of sight.” 

And, last but not least, the keys are placed in an ergonomic position for a more natural finger splay, with ample cushioning wrist cushioning that helps prevent overuse injuries such as a carpal tunnel.

4. Noise-cancelling Headphones

To truly get in the zone, you should block out distractions with headphones the cancel noise in your environment—especially if your work station is set up in a common area. Other tips to stay focused include installing a website blocker and leaving your cellphone on the other side of the room.

5. House plant or flowers

People are scientifically proven to be more productive when working near fresh flowers or lush greenery. The good news is that you don’t need to have a green thumb or natural lighting to achieve this effect—even artificial foliage can brighten your mood and improve your performance.

Working from home sometimes can feel like you’re locked inside all day, so bringing the outside world inside your space can help ward off burnout.

Take these tips with you into 2021 and set yourself up for success in your new home office setting.

Source: https://www.aiiottalk.com/business/work-from-home-office-essentials/

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zomato digitizes menus using Amazon Textract and Amazon SageMaker

This post is co-written by Chiranjeev Ghai, ML Engineer at zomato. zomato is a global food-tech company based in India. Are you the kind of person who has very specific cravings? Maybe when the mood hits, you don’t want just any kind of Indian food—you want Chicken Chettinad with a side of paratha, and nothing […]

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This post is co-written by Chiranjeev Ghai, ML Engineer at zomato. zomato is a global food-tech company based in India.

Are you the kind of person who has very specific cravings? Maybe when the mood hits, you don’t want just any kind of Indian food—you want Chicken Chettinad with a side of paratha, and nothing else will hit the spot! To help picky eaters satisfy their cravings, we at zomato have recently added enhanced search engine capabilities to our restaurant aggregation and food delivery platform. These capabilities enable us to recommend restaurants to zomato users based on searches for specific dishes.

We power this functionality with machine learning (ML), using it to extract and structure text data from menu images. To develop this menu digitization technology, we partnered with Amazon ML Solutions Lab to explore the capabilities of the AWS ML Stack. This post summarizes how we used Amazon Textract and Amazon SageMaker to develop a customized menu digitization solution.

Extracting raw text from menus with Amazon Textract

The first component of this solution was to accurately extract all the text in the menu image. This process is known as optical character recognition (OCR). For our use case, we experimented with both in-house and commercial OCR solutions.

We first created an in-house OCR solution by stacking a pre-trained text detection model and a pre-trained text recognition model. The challenge with these models was that they were trained on a standard text dataset that didn’t match the eclectic fonts found in restaurant menus. To improve system performance, we fine-tuned these models by generating a dataset of 1.5 million synthetic text images that were more representative of text in menus.

After evaluating our in-house solution and several commercial OCR solutions, we found that Amazon Textract offers the best text recognition precision and recall. Restaurants often get creative when designing their menus, so OCR robustness was crucial for this use case. Amazon Textract particularly differentiated itself when processing menus with unique fonts, background images, and low image resolutions. Using it is as simple as making an API call:

#Python 3.6
import boto3
textract_client = boto3.client( 'textract', region_name = '' #insert the AWS region you're working in
)
textract_response = textract_client.detect_document_text( Document={ 'S3Object': { 'Bucket': '', #insert the name of the S3 bucket containing your image 'Name': '' #insert the S3 key of your image } }
) print(textract_response)

The following code is the Amazon Textract output for a sample image:

{'DocumentMetadata': {'Pages': 1}, 'Blocks': [{'BlockType': 'PAGE', 'Geometry': {'BoundingBox': {'Width': 1.0, 'Height': 1.0, 'Left': 0.0, 'Top': 0.0}, ... {'BlockType': 'WORD', 'Text': 'Dim', 'Geometry': {'BoundingBox': {'Width': 0.10242128372192383, 'Height': 0. 048968635499477386, 'Left': 0. 24052166938781738, 'Top': 0. 02556285448372364},
... 

The raw outputs are visualized by overlaying them on top of the image. The following image visualizes the preceding raw output. The black boxes are the text-detection bounding boxes provided by Amazon Textract. Extracted text is displayed on the right. Note the unconventional fonts, colors, and images on this menu.

The following image visualizes Amazon Textract outputs for a menu with a different design. Black boxes are the text-detection bounding boxes provided by Amazon Textract. Extracted text is displayed on the right. Again, this menu has unconventional fonts, colors, and images.

Using Amazon SageMaker to build a menu structure detector

The next component of this solution was to group the detections from Amazon Textract by menu section. This enabled our search engine to distinguish between entrees, desserts, beverages, and so on. We framed this as a computer vision problem—object detection, to be precise—and used Amazon SageMaker Ground Truth to collect training data. Ground Truth accelerated this process by providing a fully managed annotation tool that we customized to ask human annotators to draw bounding boxes around every menu section in the image. We used an annotation workforce from AWS Marketplace because this was a niche labeling task, and public labelers from Amazon Mechanical Turk didn’t perform well. With Ground Truth, it took just a few days and approximately $1,400 to label 4,086 images with triplicate redundancy.

With labeled data in hand, we faced a paradox of choice when selecting model-building approaches because object detection is such a thoroughly studied problem. Our choices included:

  • Removing low-confidence labels from the labeled dataset – Because even human annotators can make mistakes, Ground Truth calculates confidence scores for labels by having multiple annotators (for this use case, three) label the same image. Setting a higher confidence threshold for labels can decrease the noise in the training data at the expense of having less training data.
  • Data augmentation – Techniques for image data augmentation include horizontal flipping, cropping, shearing, and rotation. Data augmentation can make models more robust by increasing the amount of training data. However, excessive data augmentation may result in poor model convergence.
  • Feature engineering – From our experience in applying computer vision to processing menus, we had a variety of techniques in mind to emphasize or de-emphasize various aspects of the input images. For example, see the following images.

The following is the original image of a menu.

The following image shows the redacted image (overlay white boxes on a black background where text detections were found).

The following is a text cropped image. On a black background, the image has overlay crops from the original image where text detections were found.

The following is a single channel and text cropped image. The image is encoded as a single RGB channel (for this image, green). You can apply this with other transformations, in this case text cropping.

 

We also had the following additional model-building methods to choose from:

  • Model architectures like YOLO, SSD, and RCNN, with VGG or ResNet backbones – Each architecture has different trade-offs of model accuracy, inference time, model size, and more. For this use case, model accuracy was the most important metric because menu images were batch processed.
  • Using a model pre-trained on a general object detection task or starting from scratch – Transfer learning can be helpful when training complex models on small datasets. However, the task of detecting menu sections is very different from a general object detection task (for example, PASCAL VOC), so the pre-training may not be relevant.
  • Optimizer parameters – These include learning rate, momentum, regularization coefficients, and early stopping configuration.

With so many hyperparameters to consider, we turned to the automatic tuning feature of Amazon SageMaker to coordinate a massive tuning job across all these variables. The following code is an example of tuning a single model architecture and input data configuration:

import sagemaker
import boto3
from sagemaker.amazon.amazon_estimator import get_image_uri
from sagemaker.estimator import Estimator
from sagemaker.tuner import HyperparameterTuner, IntegerParameter, CategoricalParameter, ContinuousParameter
import itertools
from time import sleep #set to the region you're working in
REGION_NAME = ''
#set a S3 path for SageMaker to store the outputs of the training jobs S3_OUTPUT_PATH = ''
#set a S3 location for your training dataset, #assumed to be an augmented manifest file
#see: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/sagemaker/latest/dg/augmented-manifest.html
TRAIN_DATA_LOCATION = ''
#set a S3 location for your validation data, #assumed to be an augmented manifest file
VAL_DATA_LOCATION = ''
#specify which fields in the augmented manifest file are relevant for training
DATA_ATTRIBUTE_NAMES = [,]
#specify image shape
IMAGE_SHAPE = #specify label width
LABEL_WIDTH = #specify number of samples in the training dataset
NUM_TRAINING_SAMPLES = sgm_role = sagemaker.get_execution_role()
boto_session = boto3.session.Session( region_name = REGION_NAME
)
sgm_session = sagemaker.Session( boto_session = boto_session
)
training_image = get_image_uri( region_name = REGION_NAME, repo_name = 'object-detection', repo_version = 'latest'
) #set training job configuration
object_detection_estimator = Estimator( image_name = training_image, role = sgm_role, train_instance_count = 1, train_instance_type = 'ml.p3.2xlarge', train_volume_size = 50, train_max_run = 360000, input_mode = 'Pipe', output_path = S3_OUTPUT_PATH, sagemaker_session = sgm_session
) #set input data configuration
train_data = sagemaker.session.s3_input( s3_data = TRAIN_DATA_LOCATION, distribution = 'FullyReplicated', record_wrapping = 'RecordIO', s3_data_type = 'AugmentedManifestFile', attribute_names = DATA_ATTRIBUTE_NAMES
) val_data = sagemaker.session.s3_input( s3_data = VAL_DATA_LOCATION, distribution = 'FullyReplicated', record_wrapping = 'RecordIO', s3_data_type = 'AugmentedManifestFile', attribute_names = DATA_ATTRIBUTE_NAMES
) data_channels = { 'train': train_data, 'validation' : val_data
} #set static hyperparameters
#see: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/sagemaker/latest/dg/object-detection-api-config.html
static_hyperparameters = { 'num_classes' : 1, 'epochs' : 100, 'lr_scheduler_step' : '15,30', 'lr_scheduler_factor' : 0.1, 'overlap_threshold' : 0.5, 'nms_threshold' : 0.45, 'image_shape' : IMAGE_SHAPE, 'label_width' : LABEL_WIDTH, 'num_training_samples' : NUM_TRAINING_SAMPLES, 'early_stopping' : True, 'early_stopping_min_epochs' : 5, 'early_stopping_patience' : 1, 'early_stopping_tolerance' : 0.05,
} #set ranges for tunable hyperparameters
hyperparameter_ranges = { 'learning_rate': ContinuousParameter( min_value = 1e-5, max_value = 1e-2, scaling_type = 'Auto' ), 'mini_batch_size': IntegerParameter( min_value = 8, max_value = 64, scaling_type = 'Auto' )
} #Not all hyperparameters are feasible to tune directly
#see: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/sagemaker/latest/dg/object-detection-tuning.html
#For these we run model tuning jobs in parallel using a for loop
#We take this approach for tuning over different model architectures #and different feature engineering configurations
use_pretrained_options = [0, 1]
base_network_options = ['resnet-50', 'vgg-16'] for use_pretrained, base_network in itertools.product(use_pretrained_options, base_network_options): static_hyperparameter_configuration = { **static_hyperparameters, 'use_pretrained_model' : use_pretrained, 'base_network' : base_network } object_detection_estimator.set_hyperparameters( **static_hyperparameter_configuration ) tuner = HyperparameterTuner( estimator = object_detection_estimator, objective_metric_name = 'validation:mAP', strategy = 'Bayesian', hyperparameter_ranges = hyperparameter_ranges, max_jobs = 24, max_parallel_jobs = 2, early_stopping_type = 'Auto', ) tuner.fit( inputs = data_channels ) print(f'Started tuning job: {tuner.latest_tuning_job.name}') #wait a bit before starting next job so auto generated names don't conflict sleep(60)

This code uses version 1.72.0 of the Amazon SageMaker Python SDK, which is the default version installed in Amazon SageMaker notebook instances. Version 2.X introduces breaking changes. For more information, see Use Version 2.x of the SageMaker Python SDK.

We used powerful GPU hardware (p3.2xlarge instances), and it took us just 1 week and approximately $1,500 to explore 455 unique parameter configurations. Of these configurations, Amazon SageMaker found that a fine-tuned Faster R-CNN model with text cropping performed the best, with a mean average precision score of 0.93. This aligned with results from our prior work in this space, which found that two-stage detectors generally outperform single-stage detectors in processing menus.

The following is an example of how the object detection model processed a menu. In this image, the purple boxes are the predicted bounding boxes from the menu section detection model. Black boxes are the text detection bounding boxes provided by Amazon Textract.

Using Amazon SageMaker to build rule- and ML-based text classifiers

The final component in the solution was a layer of text classification. To enable our enhanced search functionality, we had to know if each detection within a menu section was the menu section title, name of a dish, price of a dish, or something else (such as a description of a dish or the name of the restaurant). To this end, we developed a hybrid rule- and ML-based text classification system.

The first step of the classification was to use a rule to determine if a detection was a price or not. This rule simply calculated the proportion of numeric characters in the detection. If the proportion was greater than 40%, the detection was classified as a price. Although simple, this classifier worked well in practice. We used Amazon SageMaker notebook instances as a convenient interactive environment to develop this and other rules.

After the prices were filtered out, the remaining detections were classified as dish or not dish. From our experience in processing menus, we intuitively knew that in many cases, the location of prices was sufficient to do this classification. For these menus, dishes and prices are listed side by side, so simply classifying detections located to the left of prices as dishes worked well.

The following example shows how the rules-based text classification system processed a menu. Green boxes are detections classified as dishes (by the price location rule). Red boxes are detections classified as not dishes (by the price location rule). Blue boxes are detections classified as prices. Final dish detections are on the right.

Some menus might include lengthy dish descriptions or may not list prices next to individual dishes. These menus violate the assumptions of the price location rules, so we turned to model-based text classification. We used Amazon SageMaker training jobs to experiment with many modeling approaches in parallel, including an XGBoost model trained on hashed word count vectors. In the end, we found that a fine-tuned BERT model from GluonNLP achieved the best performance with an AUROC score of 0.86.

The following image is an example of how the model-based text classification system processed a menu. Green boxes are detections classified as dishes (by the BERT model). Red boxes are detections classified as not dishes (by the BERT model). Blue boxes are detections classified as prices. The final dish detections are on the right.

Of the remaining detections (those not classified as prices or dishes), a final round of classification identified menu section titles. We created features that captured the font size of the detection, the location of the detection on the menu, and the length of the words within the detection. We used these features as inputs to a logistic regression model that predicted if a detection is a menu section title or not.

Key features of Amazon SageMaker

In the end, we found that doing OCR was as simple as making an API call to Amazon Textract. However, our use case required additional customization. We selected Amazon SageMaker as an ML platform to develop this customization because it offered several key features:

  • Amazon SageMaker Notebooks made it easy to spin up Jupyter notebook environments for prototyping and testing rules and models.
  • Ground Truth helped us build and deploy a custom image annotation tool with no front-end experience required.
  • Amazon SageMaker automatic tuning enabled us to run massive hyperparameter tuning jobs on powerful hardware, and included an intuitive interface for tracking the results of hundreds of experiments. You can implement tuning jobs with early stopping conditions, which makes experimentation cost-effective.

Amazon SageMaker offers additional integration benefits from including all the preceding features in a single platform:

  • Amazon SageMaker Notebooks come pre-installed with all the dependencies needed to build models that can be optimized with automatic tuning.
  • Ground Truth offers easy access to labelers from Mechanical Turk or AWS Marketplace.
  • Automatic tuning can directly ingest the manifest files created by Amazon SageMaker Ground Truth.

Putting it all together

Our menu digitization system can extract text from images of menus, group it by menu section, extract the title of the section, extract the dishes within each section, and pair each dish with its price. The following is a visualization of the end-to-end solution.

The workflow contains the following steps:

  1. The input is an image of a menu.
  2. Amazon Textract performs OCR on the input image.
  3. An ML-based computer vision model predicts bounding boxes for menu sections in the menu image.
  4. A rules-based classifier classifies Amazon Textract detections as price or not price.
  5. A rules-based classifier (5a) attempts to use the location of price detections to classify the not price detections as dish or not dish. If this rule doesn’t successfully classify most of the detections on the page, an ML-based classifier is used instead (5b).
  6. The ML-based classifier uses hand-crafted features to classify not dish detections as menu section title or not menu section title.
  7.  The menu text is structured by combining the menu section detections and the text classification results.

The following image visualizes a sample output of the system. Green boxes are detections classified as dishes. Blue boxes are detections classified as prices. Yellow boxes are detections classified as menu section titles. Purple boxes are predicted menu section bounding boxes.

The following code is the structured output:

[ { "title":{ "text":"Shrimp Dishes" }, "dishes":[ { "text":"Shrimp Masala", "price":{ "text":"140" } }, { "text":"Shrimp Biryani", "price":{ "text":"170" } }, { "text":"Shrimp Pulav", "price":{ "text":"160" } } ] }, ...
]

Conclusion

We built a system that uses ML to digitize menus without any human input required. This system will improve user experience by powering new features such as advanced dish search and review highlight verification. Our content team will also use it to accelerate creating menus for online ordering.

To explore these capabilities of Amazon Textract and Amazon SageMaker in more depth, see Automatically extract text and structured data from documents with Amazon Textract and Amazon SageMaker Automatic Model Tuning: Using Machine Learning for Machine Learning.

The Amazon ML Solutions Lab helped us accelerate our use of ML by pairing our team with ML experts. The ML Solutions Lab brings to every customer engagement learnings from more than 20 years of Amazon’s ML innovations in areas such as fulfillment and logistics, personalization and recommendations, computer vision and translation, fraud prevention, forecasting, and supply chain optimization. To learn more about the AWS ML Solutions Lab, contact your account manager or visit Amazon Machine Learning Solutions Lab.


About the Authors

Chiranjeev Ghai is a Machine Learning Engineer. In his current role, he has been aiding automation at zomato by leveraging a wide variety of ML optimisations ranging from Image Classification, Product Recommendation, and Text Detection. When not building models, he likes to spend his time playing video games at home.

Ryan Cheng is a Deep Learning Architect in the Amazon ML Solutions Lab. He has worked on a wide range of ML use cases from sports analytics to optical character recognition. In his spare time, Ryan enjoys cooking.

Andrew Ang is a Deep Learning Architect at the Amazon ML Solutions Lab, where he helps AWS customers identify and build AI/ML solutions to address their business problems.

Vinayak Arannil is a Data Scientist at the Amazon Machine Learning Solutions Lab. He has worked on various domains of data science like computer vision, natural language processing, recommendation systems, etc.

Source: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/machine-learning/zomato-digitizes-menus-using-amazon-textract-and-amazon-sagemaker/

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zomato digitizes menus using Amazon Textract and Amazon SageMaker

This post is co-written by Chiranjeev Ghai, ML Engineer at zomato. zomato is a global food-tech company based in India. Are you the kind of person who has very specific cravings? Maybe when the mood hits, you don’t want just any kind of Indian food—you want Chicken Chettinad with a side of paratha, and nothing […]

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This post is co-written by Chiranjeev Ghai, ML Engineer at zomato. zomato is a global food-tech company based in India.

Are you the kind of person who has very specific cravings? Maybe when the mood hits, you don’t want just any kind of Indian food—you want Chicken Chettinad with a side of paratha, and nothing else will hit the spot! To help picky eaters satisfy their cravings, we at zomato have recently added enhanced search engine capabilities to our restaurant aggregation and food delivery platform. These capabilities enable us to recommend restaurants to zomato users based on searches for specific dishes.

We power this functionality with machine learning (ML), using it to extract and structure text data from menu images. To develop this menu digitization technology, we partnered with Amazon ML Solutions Lab to explore the capabilities of the AWS ML Stack. This post summarizes how we used Amazon Textract and Amazon SageMaker to develop a customized menu digitization solution.

Extracting raw text from menus with Amazon Textract

The first component of this solution was to accurately extract all the text in the menu image. This process is known as optical character recognition (OCR). For our use case, we experimented with both in-house and commercial OCR solutions.

We first created an in-house OCR solution by stacking a pre-trained text detection model and a pre-trained text recognition model. The challenge with these models was that they were trained on a standard text dataset that didn’t match the eclectic fonts found in restaurant menus. To improve system performance, we fine-tuned these models by generating a dataset of 1.5 million synthetic text images that were more representative of text in menus.

After evaluating our in-house solution and several commercial OCR solutions, we found that Amazon Textract offers the best text recognition precision and recall. Restaurants often get creative when designing their menus, so OCR robustness was crucial for this use case. Amazon Textract particularly differentiated itself when processing menus with unique fonts, background images, and low image resolutions. Using it is as simple as making an API call:

#Python 3.6
import boto3
textract_client = boto3.client( 'textract', region_name = '' #insert the AWS region you're working in
)
textract_response = textract_client.detect_document_text( Document={ 'S3Object': { 'Bucket': '', #insert the name of the S3 bucket containing your image 'Name': '' #insert the S3 key of your image } }
) print(textract_response)

The following code is the Amazon Textract output for a sample image:

{'DocumentMetadata': {'Pages': 1}, 'Blocks': [{'BlockType': 'PAGE', 'Geometry': {'BoundingBox': {'Width': 1.0, 'Height': 1.0, 'Left': 0.0, 'Top': 0.0}, ... {'BlockType': 'WORD', 'Text': 'Dim', 'Geometry': {'BoundingBox': {'Width': 0.10242128372192383, 'Height': 0. 048968635499477386, 'Left': 0. 24052166938781738, 'Top': 0. 02556285448372364},
... 

The raw outputs are visualized by overlaying them on top of the image. The following image visualizes the preceding raw output. The black boxes are the text-detection bounding boxes provided by Amazon Textract. Extracted text is displayed on the right. Note the unconventional fonts, colors, and images on this menu.

The following image visualizes Amazon Textract outputs for a menu with a different design. Black boxes are the text-detection bounding boxes provided by Amazon Textract. Extracted text is displayed on the right. Again, this menu has unconventional fonts, colors, and images.

Using Amazon SageMaker to build a menu structure detector

The next component of this solution was to group the detections from Amazon Textract by menu section. This enabled our search engine to distinguish between entrees, desserts, beverages, and so on. We framed this as a computer vision problem—object detection, to be precise—and used Amazon SageMaker Ground Truth to collect training data. Ground Truth accelerated this process by providing a fully managed annotation tool that we customized to ask human annotators to draw bounding boxes around every menu section in the image. We used an annotation workforce from AWS Marketplace because this was a niche labeling task, and public labelers from Amazon Mechanical Turk didn’t perform well. With Ground Truth, it took just a few days and approximately $1,400 to label 4,086 images with triplicate redundancy.

With labeled data in hand, we faced a paradox of choice when selecting model-building approaches because object detection is such a thoroughly studied problem. Our choices included:

  • Removing low-confidence labels from the labeled dataset – Because even human annotators can make mistakes, Ground Truth calculates confidence scores for labels by having multiple annotators (for this use case, three) label the same image. Setting a higher confidence threshold for labels can decrease the noise in the training data at the expense of having less training data.
  • Data augmentation – Techniques for image data augmentation include horizontal flipping, cropping, shearing, and rotation. Data augmentation can make models more robust by increasing the amount of training data. However, excessive data augmentation may result in poor model convergence.
  • Feature engineering – From our experience in applying computer vision to processing menus, we had a variety of techniques in mind to emphasize or de-emphasize various aspects of the input images. For example, see the following images.

The following is the original image of a menu.

The following image shows the redacted image (overlay white boxes on a black background where text detections were found).

The following is a text cropped image. On a black background, the image has overlay crops from the original image where text detections were found.

The following is a single channel and text cropped image. The image is encoded as a single RGB channel (for this image, green). You can apply this with other transformations, in this case text cropping.

 

We also had the following additional model-building methods to choose from:

  • Model architectures like YOLO, SSD, and RCNN, with VGG or ResNet backbones – Each architecture has different trade-offs of model accuracy, inference time, model size, and more. For this use case, model accuracy was the most important metric because menu images were batch processed.
  • Using a model pre-trained on a general object detection task or starting from scratch – Transfer learning can be helpful when training complex models on small datasets. However, the task of detecting menu sections is very different from a general object detection task (for example, PASCAL VOC), so the pre-training may not be relevant.
  • Optimizer parameters – These include learning rate, momentum, regularization coefficients, and early stopping configuration.

With so many hyperparameters to consider, we turned to the automatic tuning feature of Amazon SageMaker to coordinate a massive tuning job across all these variables. The following code is an example of tuning a single model architecture and input data configuration:

import sagemaker
import boto3
from sagemaker.amazon.amazon_estimator import get_image_uri
from sagemaker.estimator import Estimator
from sagemaker.tuner import HyperparameterTuner, IntegerParameter, CategoricalParameter, ContinuousParameter
import itertools
from time import sleep #set to the region you're working in
REGION_NAME = ''
#set a S3 path for SageMaker to store the outputs of the training jobs S3_OUTPUT_PATH = ''
#set a S3 location for your training dataset, #assumed to be an augmented manifest file
#see: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/sagemaker/latest/dg/augmented-manifest.html
TRAIN_DATA_LOCATION = ''
#set a S3 location for your validation data, #assumed to be an augmented manifest file
VAL_DATA_LOCATION = ''
#specify which fields in the augmented manifest file are relevant for training
DATA_ATTRIBUTE_NAMES = [,]
#specify image shape
IMAGE_SHAPE = #specify label width
LABEL_WIDTH = #specify number of samples in the training dataset
NUM_TRAINING_SAMPLES = sgm_role = sagemaker.get_execution_role()
boto_session = boto3.session.Session( region_name = REGION_NAME
)
sgm_session = sagemaker.Session( boto_session = boto_session
)
training_image = get_image_uri( region_name = REGION_NAME, repo_name = 'object-detection', repo_version = 'latest'
) #set training job configuration
object_detection_estimator = Estimator( image_name = training_image, role = sgm_role, train_instance_count = 1, train_instance_type = 'ml.p3.2xlarge', train_volume_size = 50, train_max_run = 360000, input_mode = 'Pipe', output_path = S3_OUTPUT_PATH, sagemaker_session = sgm_session
) #set input data configuration
train_data = sagemaker.session.s3_input( s3_data = TRAIN_DATA_LOCATION, distribution = 'FullyReplicated', record_wrapping = 'RecordIO', s3_data_type = 'AugmentedManifestFile', attribute_names = DATA_ATTRIBUTE_NAMES
) val_data = sagemaker.session.s3_input( s3_data = VAL_DATA_LOCATION, distribution = 'FullyReplicated', record_wrapping = 'RecordIO', s3_data_type = 'AugmentedManifestFile', attribute_names = DATA_ATTRIBUTE_NAMES
) data_channels = { 'train': train_data, 'validation' : val_data
} #set static hyperparameters
#see: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/sagemaker/latest/dg/object-detection-api-config.html
static_hyperparameters = { 'num_classes' : 1, 'epochs' : 100, 'lr_scheduler_step' : '15,30', 'lr_scheduler_factor' : 0.1, 'overlap_threshold' : 0.5, 'nms_threshold' : 0.45, 'image_shape' : IMAGE_SHAPE, 'label_width' : LABEL_WIDTH, 'num_training_samples' : NUM_TRAINING_SAMPLES, 'early_stopping' : True, 'early_stopping_min_epochs' : 5, 'early_stopping_patience' : 1, 'early_stopping_tolerance' : 0.05,
} #set ranges for tunable hyperparameters
hyperparameter_ranges = { 'learning_rate': ContinuousParameter( min_value = 1e-5, max_value = 1e-2, scaling_type = 'Auto' ), 'mini_batch_size': IntegerParameter( min_value = 8, max_value = 64, scaling_type = 'Auto' )
} #Not all hyperparameters are feasible to tune directly
#see: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/sagemaker/latest/dg/object-detection-tuning.html
#For these we run model tuning jobs in parallel using a for loop
#We take this approach for tuning over different model architectures #and different feature engineering configurations
use_pretrained_options = [0, 1]
base_network_options = ['resnet-50', 'vgg-16'] for use_pretrained, base_network in itertools.product(use_pretrained_options, base_network_options): static_hyperparameter_configuration = { **static_hyperparameters, 'use_pretrained_model' : use_pretrained, 'base_network' : base_network } object_detection_estimator.set_hyperparameters( **static_hyperparameter_configuration ) tuner = HyperparameterTuner( estimator = object_detection_estimator, objective_metric_name = 'validation:mAP', strategy = 'Bayesian', hyperparameter_ranges = hyperparameter_ranges, max_jobs = 24, max_parallel_jobs = 2, early_stopping_type = 'Auto', ) tuner.fit( inputs = data_channels ) print(f'Started tuning job: {tuner.latest_tuning_job.name}') #wait a bit before starting next job so auto generated names don't conflict sleep(60)

This code uses version 1.72.0 of the Amazon SageMaker Python SDK, which is the default version installed in Amazon SageMaker notebook instances. Version 2.X introduces breaking changes. For more information, see Use Version 2.x of the SageMaker Python SDK.

We used powerful GPU hardware (p3.2xlarge instances), and it took us just 1 week and approximately $1,500 to explore 455 unique parameter configurations. Of these configurations, Amazon SageMaker found that a fine-tuned Faster R-CNN model with text cropping performed the best, with a mean average precision score of 0.93. This aligned with results from our prior work in this space, which found that two-stage detectors generally outperform single-stage detectors in processing menus.

The following is an example of how the object detection model processed a menu. In this image, the purple boxes are the predicted bounding boxes from the menu section detection model. Black boxes are the text detection bounding boxes provided by Amazon Textract.

Using Amazon SageMaker to build rule- and ML-based text classifiers

The final component in the solution was a layer of text classification. To enable our enhanced search functionality, we had to know if each detection within a menu section was the menu section title, name of a dish, price of a dish, or something else (such as a description of a dish or the name of the restaurant). To this end, we developed a hybrid rule- and ML-based text classification system.

The first step of the classification was to use a rule to determine if a detection was a price or not. This rule simply calculated the proportion of numeric characters in the detection. If the proportion was greater than 40%, the detection was classified as a price. Although simple, this classifier worked well in practice. We used Amazon SageMaker notebook instances as a convenient interactive environment to develop this and other rules.

After the prices were filtered out, the remaining detections were classified as dish or not dish. From our experience in processing menus, we intuitively knew that in many cases, the location of prices was sufficient to do this classification. For these menus, dishes and prices are listed side by side, so simply classifying detections located to the left of prices as dishes worked well.

The following example shows how the rules-based text classification system processed a menu. Green boxes are detections classified as dishes (by the price location rule). Red boxes are detections classified as not dishes (by the price location rule). Blue boxes are detections classified as prices. Final dish detections are on the right.

Some menus might include lengthy dish descriptions or may not list prices next to individual dishes. These menus violate the assumptions of the price location rules, so we turned to model-based text classification. We used Amazon SageMaker training jobs to experiment with many modeling approaches in parallel, including an XGBoost model trained on hashed word count vectors. In the end, we found that a fine-tuned BERT model from GluonNLP achieved the best performance with an AUROC score of 0.86.

The following image is an example of how the model-based text classification system processed a menu. Green boxes are detections classified as dishes (by the BERT model). Red boxes are detections classified as not dishes (by the BERT model). Blue boxes are detections classified as prices. The final dish detections are on the right.

Of the remaining detections (those not classified as prices or dishes), a final round of classification identified menu section titles. We created features that captured the font size of the detection, the location of the detection on the menu, and the length of the words within the detection. We used these features as inputs to a logistic regression model that predicted if a detection is a menu section title or not.

Key features of Amazon SageMaker

In the end, we found that doing OCR was as simple as making an API call to Amazon Textract. However, our use case required additional customization. We selected Amazon SageMaker as an ML platform to develop this customization because it offered several key features:

  • Amazon SageMaker Notebooks made it easy to spin up Jupyter notebook environments for prototyping and testing rules and models.
  • Ground Truth helped us build and deploy a custom image annotation tool with no front-end experience required.
  • Amazon SageMaker automatic tuning enabled us to run massive hyperparameter tuning jobs on powerful hardware, and included an intuitive interface for tracking the results of hundreds of experiments. You can implement tuning jobs with early stopping conditions, which makes experimentation cost-effective.

Amazon SageMaker offers additional integration benefits from including all the preceding features in a single platform:

  • Amazon SageMaker Notebooks come pre-installed with all the dependencies needed to build models that can be optimized with automatic tuning.
  • Ground Truth offers easy access to labelers from Mechanical Turk or AWS Marketplace.
  • Automatic tuning can directly ingest the manifest files created by Amazon SageMaker Ground Truth.

Putting it all together

Our menu digitization system can extract text from images of menus, group it by menu section, extract the title of the section, extract the dishes within each section, and pair each dish with its price. The following is a visualization of the end-to-end solution.

The workflow contains the following steps:

  1. The input is an image of a menu.
  2. Amazon Textract performs OCR on the input image.
  3. An ML-based computer vision model predicts bounding boxes for menu sections in the menu image.
  4. A rules-based classifier classifies Amazon Textract detections as price or not price.
  5. A rules-based classifier (5a) attempts to use the location of price detections to classify the not price detections as dish or not dish. If this rule doesn’t successfully classify most of the detections on the page, an ML-based classifier is used instead (5b).
  6. The ML-based classifier uses hand-crafted features to classify not dish detections as menu section title or not menu section title.
  7.  The menu text is structured by combining the menu section detections and the text classification results.

The following image visualizes a sample output of the system. Green boxes are detections classified as dishes. Blue boxes are detections classified as prices. Yellow boxes are detections classified as menu section titles. Purple boxes are predicted menu section bounding boxes.

The following code is the structured output:

[ { "title":{ "text":"Shrimp Dishes" }, "dishes":[ { "text":"Shrimp Masala", "price":{ "text":"140" } }, { "text":"Shrimp Biryani", "price":{ "text":"170" } }, { "text":"Shrimp Pulav", "price":{ "text":"160" } } ] }, ...
]

Conclusion

We built a system that uses ML to digitize menus without any human input required. This system will improve user experience by powering new features such as advanced dish search and review highlight verification. Our content team will also use it to accelerate creating menus for online ordering.

To explore these capabilities of Amazon Textract and Amazon SageMaker in more depth, see Automatically extract text and structured data from documents with Amazon Textract and Amazon SageMaker Automatic Model Tuning: Using Machine Learning for Machine Learning.

The Amazon ML Solutions Lab helped us accelerate our use of ML by pairing our team with ML experts. The ML Solutions Lab brings to every customer engagement learnings from more than 20 years of Amazon’s ML innovations in areas such as fulfillment and logistics, personalization and recommendations, computer vision and translation, fraud prevention, forecasting, and supply chain optimization. To learn more about the AWS ML Solutions Lab, contact your account manager or visit Amazon Machine Learning Solutions Lab.


About the Authors

Chiranjeev Ghai is a Machine Learning Engineer. In his current role, he has been aiding automation at zomato by leveraging a wide variety of ML optimisations ranging from Image Classification, Product Recommendation, and Text Detection. When not building models, he likes to spend his time playing video games at home.

Ryan Cheng is a Deep Learning Architect in the Amazon ML Solutions Lab. He has worked on a wide range of ML use cases from sports analytics to optical character recognition. In his spare time, Ryan enjoys cooking.

Andrew Ang is a Deep Learning Architect at the Amazon ML Solutions Lab, where he helps AWS customers identify and build AI/ML solutions to address their business problems.

Vinayak Arannil is a Data Scientist at the Amazon Machine Learning Solutions Lab. He has worked on various domains of data science like computer vision, natural language processing, recommendation systems, etc.

Source: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/machine-learning/zomato-digitizes-menus-using-amazon-textract-and-amazon-sagemaker/

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